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Monday, August 30, 2010

DEATH

Sister Kristy: When somebody dies it takes a toll on you. When you thought that person still had time with you. Unexpected death is hard to handle, no warnings or signals to interpret. Or maybe there were signs there that you chose to ignore…..like many trips to the doctor or emergency room. But they always left with a clean bill of health, only to lose the fight shortly thereafter. One thing I have come to know is that all of this could be made worse without the support of others. No support from those closest to you. No well wishes. Just comments about how you should have or could have seen death approaching. When you share your heart with a loved one no matter how sick they are or how near to death they are…..you don’t ever want to believe that they are slipping away. No matter how many “signs” comes your way. No matter how many “he or she lived a good life” you get. In the end none of it helps.


Crying, fading memories of your life together all take place immediately. Supporting you ……sheltering you…..you who carried me through boyfriends, states, heartache, and homelessness….solid as a rock you were to me. I’ll miss the gift you were to me. Gone you are to me. Cherished you will be to me. Love you always. My baby……..      ©2010 Kristy Magazine

Sister Melissa: Dealing with death is hard no matter how old you are. There are no special ways to deal with death even though it’s a natural part of our life. The only advice that I can offer is knowing yourself help you to deal with death and how you handle it, but know that everyone deals with this differently. It helps to know the person that you are dealing with because then you can better serve their needs. When someone loses someone, especially unexpectantly, remember you are there to serve them to the best of your ability but according to what THEY need, not what you think is best.  Be sensitive to them just as you would want someone to be sensitive and conscious of you and your loss. Words sometimes are not enough. Sometimes the language of silence speaks volumes, or your presence brings them comfort that says enough.

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